Online Editorials Archive



Festive Science

Red(December 22nd, 2016) At the future Centre of Excellence for Santa Claus Research, four Norwegian scientists revealed Santa's undercover identity and the relationship between him, his subordinates and the children he visits. more

Easy Processing

Red(December 20th, 2016) Responding to their colleagues' desire of quickly exploring bioimage data in a reproducible fashion, UK scientists developed a new open source tool for image analysis that requires only a minimum amount of programming skills. more

Science Fun of the Week

Red(December 16th, 2016) Get ready for your weekly dose of science fun. Today: Tasting Feet! more

‘Narcissism in Science’ Part 3: Solutions?

Red(December 15th, 2016) Bruno Lemaitre, Professor of Genetics at EPFL, recently published a book about narcissism in science. In this 3-part interview, LT reporter, Jeremy Garwood, talked with him about his findings and how they might improve our scientific outlook. more

‘Narcissism in Science’ Part 2: Bad Behaviour

Red(December 13th, 2016) Bruno Lemaitre, Professor of Genetics at EPFL, recently published a book about narcissism in science. In this 3-part interview, LT reporter, Jeremy Garwood, talked with him about his findings and how they might improve our scientific outlook. more

Science Fun of the Week

Red(December 9th, 2016) Get ready for your weekly dose of science fun. Today: The eyes have it! more

‘Narcissism in Science’ Part 1: Defining the Problem

Red(December 8th, 2016) Bruno Lemaitre, Professor of Genetics at EPFL, recently published a book about narcissism in science. In this 3-part interview, LT reporter, Jeremy Garwood, talked with him about his findings and how they might improve our scientific outlook. more

Barcoding Neurones

Red(December 6th, 2016) New ways of exploiting high throughput sequencing are emerging every day, but imagine our surprise when we heard of RNA technology being used for – wait for it – neuroanatomy. more

Science Fun of the Week

Red(December 2nd, 2016) Get ready for your weekly dose of science fun. Today: The Danish vodka myth. more

Boost your Miniprep

Red(December 1st, 2016) Imagine: it’s Friday afternoon and you want to do some maxipreps. Upon inspection, there’s not a single maxiprep column left in the kit box or in the lab’s storage room. US-American researchers might have found a solution to your problem. more


New Look on an Old Experiment

Red(November 29th, 2016) Ill-reputed Austrian 19th century biologist, Paul Kammerer, receives scientific support from current colleagues. They came up with a model of possible epigenetic mechanisms for Kammerer's midwife toad experiments. more

Science Fun of the Week

Red(November 25th, 2016) Get ready for weekly dose of science fun. Today: Physics for Biologists. more

In this Together

Red(November 24th, 2016) Fully understanding the brain takes the expertise and know-how of numerous labs. That's why, three scientists have called for a worldwide collaboration among neuroscientists to share ideas and data. more

Strategy for Success

Red(November 22nd, 2016) Comparing scientists' lab behaviour to natural ecosystems, UK researchers revealed that science's “current incentive structures are in conflict with maximising the scientific value of research”. more

Science Fun of the Week

Red(November 18th, 2016) Get ready for your weekly dose of science fun. Today: The Genome Song. more

Science - How to Have your Cake and Eat it!

Red(November 17th, 2016) During a recent conference, EPFL scientist, Enrica Rollo, won the 2016 µTAS video competition. Her mouth-watering entry? A chocolate cake that explains how cells can be separated using micropillar electrodes. more

Help, It Just Doesn't Fit!

Red(November 14th, 2016) Imagine you find yourself in a catch-22 situation with your PhD thesis. You realise the project is not exactly what you wanted to do. Should you push it further or should you quit? Lab Times contacted a PhD student, who recently made this tough decision. more

Science Fun of the Week

Red(November 11th, 2016) Get ready for your weekly dose of science fun. Today: The colon choir. more

It’s a Brexit World

Red(November 10th, 2016) On Tuesday night, an extravagant entrepreneur became president elect of the United States - Thoughts from a Central American postdoc, who recently moved to Texas. more

When Music Unravels Protein Structure and Folding

Red(November 8th, 2016) Tired of visualising complex protein structures with traditional graphical models? Try it with musical notes! more

Science Fun of the Week

Red(November 4th, 2016) Get ready for weekly dose of science fun. Today: A very true cartoon. more

Biological Polymaths

Red(November 3rd, 2016) In the age of big data and systems biology, mathematical and programming know-how becomes increasingly important. The new online platform SysMIC teaches biologists new computing tricks. more

From Lab to Table

Red(November 1st, 2016) Looking for new ways to eat fresh ingredients? Researchers at VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland have developed a prototype for a device that would enable consumers to grow edible plant cells directly in their kitchen. more


Science Fun of the Week

Red(October 28th, 2016) Get ready for your weekly dose of science fun. Today: A classic paper from the IgNobel archives, featuring zucchinis, morphine and Mr Potato Head. more

Cyanobacterial Sleeping Beauty

Red(October 27th, 2016) Our writer, Alejandrolvido, tells a scientific fairy tale, starring a perished prokaryote princess and several lion-hearted microbiologists, bringing it back from the dead. more

Crowdfunding 101

Red(October 25th, 2016) Thinking of crowdfunding your project, but don’t know where to start? Mike Schaefer, from the University of Zurich, investigates what factors make for a successful project. It turns out that jargon and dense scientific content are not very popular. more

Science Fun of the Week

Red(October 21st, 2016) Get ready for your weekly dose of science fun. Today: The happy, little devil in all of us. more

The Next Step in Tissue Culture

Red(October 20th, 2016) When 3D cell culture doesn't satisfy your expectations anymore, growing organoids could be a better option. In a new paper, scientists managed to fool stem cells into making lung alveoli look-alikes. more

Fraud or Serious Forgery?

Red(October 18th, 2016) The Danish High court cleared one of Denmark's most infamous researchers, Milena Penkowa, of certain misconduct charges. The court found her guilty of fraud but not of serious forgery. more

Science Fun of the Week

Red(October 14th, 2016) Get ready for your weekly dose of science fun. Today, we get a little poetic. more

What is Ethical Gene Editing?

Red(October 13th, 2016) The Nuffield Council on Bioethics, an independent body that advises policy makers, recently published the first findings of its review on the impact of genome editing in research. more

More Responsible Peer Review and Less “Fantasy” in Science

Red(October 11th, 2016) Science publishing is not experiencing the best of its time. Nobel laureate, Thomas Südhof analyses some of its problems and proposes potential solutions in his most recent essay. more

Science Fun of the Week

Red(October 7th, 2016) Get ready for your weekly dose of science fun. Today: A conversation with the newly-minted Ig Nobel laureate, Thomas Thwaites, aka Goat Man. more

Something about Italian Universities

Red(October 5th, 2016) Paediatrician Donato Rigante, 50 years old, recently published a letter in The Lancet, in which he has described a system of inequality in the academic promotion of professionals at Italian universities. We wanted to know more. more

Eat Me, We're Starving!

Red(October 4th, 2016) Congratulations to Yoshinori Ohsumi, who won the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his discoveries of the mechanisms of authophagy. more


Science Fun of the Week

Red(September 30th, 2016) Get ready for your weekly dose of science fun. Today: The metabolic rates of elves and hobbits. more

“Some Cartoons are Faithful Biography”

Red(September 29th, 2016) Nik Papageorgiou, the creator of the Upturned Microscope talks to Lab Times about how too much time on his hands led to the development of a comic strip now enjoyed by many. more

Nothing Fishy After All

Red(September 26th, 2016) A Science paper was recently called into question but an independent investigation found that there's no reason to suspect fraud. more

Science Fun of the Week

Red(September 23rd, 2016) Get ready for your weekly dose of science fun. Today: A revolutionary comic from the Upturned Microscope. more

The Age of Bacteria

Red(September 22nd, 2016) How long have humans and animals been plagued by pathogenic bacteria? In some cases, bacterial-human evolution is closely coupled. more

Funding to Start a Career

Red(September 20th, 2016) In early September, the European Research Council announced the lucky winners of their Starting Grants. More than 300 researchers will receive up to €1.5 million. We talked to three of them. more

Science Fun of the Week

Red(September 16th, 2016) Get ready for your weekly dose of science fun. Today: a joke for monks and geneticists. more

Change Detector

Red(September 15th, 2016) Researchers in Belgium develop a new membrane analysis tool - with high compatibility and a frightening name. more

Bon Appetit

Red(September 12th, 2016) The letters “GMO” usually trigger negative reactions in most people, particularly when it comes to food. But the CRISPR/Cas9 technique challenges the definition of GMO and was recently even used to create a tasty meal. Stefan Jansson at Umeå University had it for dinner. more

Science Fun of the Week

Red(September 9th, 2016) Get ready for your weekly dose of science fun. Today: Elephant in the laboratory. more

As Swift As Swordfish

Red(September 8th, 2016) Back in 1969, young PhD student, John Videler, started to wonder how do fish swim. Throughout his career, he collected many pieces to the puzzle. The latest comes from the mighty swordfish. more

Where are You From?

Red(September 6th, 2016) Genetic studies, high school students and gambling. How does that link together? In Denmark, an initiative by the university of Aarhus has genotyped the DNA of 800 high-school students for a large-scale genetic study – funded by the national lottery. more

Science Fun of the Week

Red(September 2nd, 2016) Get ready for your weekly dose of science fun. Today: SMART - Studying the use of Medical Acronyms Reveals interesting Trend. more

Lab Book: The Next Generation

Red(September 1st, 2016) Paper is so yesterday, electronic lab books are the latest craze. Biomedical researchers in Spain compared six of the most widely-used models on the market. more


Corrective Measures

Red(August 30th, 2016) How many bacteria inhabitate the human body? For decades, people believed that bacteria would outnumber our own cells by at least 10:1. A new study corrects the ratio to 1:1 for men and 2:1 for women. more

Science Fun of the Week

Red(August 26th, 2016) Get ready for your weekly dose of science fun. Today: a cartoon for all worm enthusiasts. And everyone else, too. more

Speaking through Graphs

Red(August 25th, 2016) Biologists often use pathway diagrams to communicate results, but methods for drawing diagrams are about as plentiful as biologists. Researchers at the University of Edinburgh have developed a scheme that combines graphical notation with pathway simulation. more

Something Fishy?

Red(August 23rd, 2016) It was one of those headline-grabbing news revelations - A recent study showed fish like to eat plastic microbeads. Now, an investigation at Uppsala University examines whether the study's data may be compromised. more

Science Fun of the Week

Red(August 19th, 2016) Get ready for your weekly dose of science fun. It starts with a joke... more

Collaborative Networks

Red(August 18th, 2016) A creative project, providing open access to 400 compounds with potential effects against malaria, recently resulted in more than a dozen drug development projects. Could this open source approach herald a new era for drug discovery? more

Practice What you Preach

Red(August 16th, 2016) When bold researchers meet courageous funding agencies; a new era of scientific integrity is about to begin. The Netherlands has launched the world’s first national fund dedicated to replication studies. more

The Ten Principles

Red(August 12th, 2016) Four of the UK's leading research organisations have launched a concordat that proposes a series of clear and practical principles for working with research data. more

A Perfect Combination

Red(August 94th, 2016) Beer has played a part in the culture of many societies. A new study by Belgian scientists has decided to test the mutual benefits of beer and music. Teaming up with the UK indie rock group The Editors, they have looked at whether sound influences the way we perceive the taste of beer. more

New Tools Needed

Red(August 5th, 2016) If ever we want to win the fight against cancer, we have to join our forces. Last month, four international research bodies did exactly this and created the Human Cancer Models Initiative. Their goal? Developing better tools to study and, eventually, defeat the disease. more

Social Brain Scanning

Red(August 2nd, 2016) Laboratory mice, rats or flies rarely stay still when researchers want to see their brains at work. Steven Buckingham reports on several methods that have been designed to overcome this challenge. more


Wellcome Open Research: A Welcome Decision?

Red(July 29th, 2016) The Wellcome Trust plans to launch a free, open access publishing platform this autumn to accelerate research publishing and “support reproducibility and transparency” for researchers. Sounds good - but this initiative has also attracted considerable scepticism. more

Brexit: A Student Union’s Perspective

Red(July 26th, 2016) The UK vote to leave the EU was a shock for many academics. But not only professors and postdocs fear the imminent consequences of the Brexit, many things are at stake also for students. more

Statistical Misunderstandings

Red(July 21st, 2016) Victor Spoormaker of the Bavarian Academy of Sciences and Humanities' Young Scholars Programme analyses the recent replication crisis in neuroscience and finds lessons for other life sciences. more

Does the End Justify the Means?

Red(July 15th, 2016) A few weeks ago, we gave you the latest news from the Sci-Hub corner in “The Dark Side of Open Access”. Delving deeper into the matter, our author, Hans Zauner, discovers that there is indeed a dark side to the paper piracy portal. more

Don't Pay Twice for your Oranges

Red(July 12th, 2016) May was a momentous month for science. World leaders called for scientific publications to be made freely available for all and some scientists, including David Fernig, went on a review strike. more

The 'Google Earth' of Biology

Red(July 7th, 2016) Get ready to visit the largest ever digital zoo, OneZoom. On display: all life forms on earth, including their evolutionary relationships. more

A Major Honour

Red(July 5th, 2016) Unravelling the mysteries of flowering and vernalisation, British plant biologist, Caroline Dean, recently received royal recognition. more


The Science of Holidays

Red(June 17th, 2016) Summer brings delight: at least that’s what you might think. Scientific literature suggests that the idea of what is good or bad weather is highly individual, that even short breaks can be therapeutic and that, on holiday, you’d do well completely to forget about work. more

A Double-Edged Sword

Red(June 14th, 2016) After the UK granted scientists the permission to manipulate human embryos a few months ago, The Netherlands has now followed suit. Recently, the Dutch government said it would allow their scientists to grow human embryos for “limited” research. A mistake or a chance for science? more

Honey, I Shrunk the Organs

Red(June 8th, 2016) This year’s Körber European Science Prize goes to Dutch professor of molecular genetics, Hans Clevers, for developing a procedure to grow miniature guts and livers from adult stem cells. more

Would you or Would you Not?

Red(June 7th, 2016) How does the public really feel about data privacy, especially when it’s about their medical data? To find out, the Wellcome Trust is currently conducting a survey. more

Computer-supported Review

Red(June 3rd, 2016) he London-based open access publisher BioMed Central is currently testing a text-mining application called StatReviewer. The software is expected to free the reviewers of clinical trial manuscripts from the more unpopular tasks. more

The Dark Side of Open Access

Red(June 1st, 2016) Publishers want to shut it down; scientists love it. The Sci-Hub repository of research articles provides a valuable service to the research community. Will it ever be able to come out of hiding? more


When Big Data isn’t Big Enough

Red(May 30th, 2016) Each day, shedloads of genomics data are generated in labs around the world. DNAdigest wants to make it available to all researchers, free of charge. more

The End of Waiting

Red(May 27th, 2016) In the current print issue, Lab Times reported on a serious case of plagiarism in the Journal of Biochemical Systematics and Ecology published by Elsevier. Now, after 14 months, the fraudulent paper is finally retracted. more

Shall we ‘Go with the Grain’?

Red(May 25th, 2016) Porridge with milk – and a look of displeasure – this is how many of our childhood mornings looked like. However, a new science-backed cookbook shows that oats and barley can be both healthy and delicious alternatives to rice or pasta. more

The Magic Trick Lies in the Eye of the Beholder

Red(May 23rd, 2016) How do magicians deceive their audience? It’s all a matter of manipulating our attention, say two neuroscientists from the UK and Japan. more

The Ethics of Peer Review: The End? (5/5)

Red(May 19th, 2016) Peer review is at the heart of research communication. However, the process is far from perfect and many problems have been identified. Among them, ethical questions about the responsible conduct of reviewers who can wield considerable power behind a cloak of anonymity. more

The Ethics of Peer Review: ‘Open’ Reviewing (4/5)

Red(May 17th, 2016) Peer review is at the heart of research communication. However, the process is far from perfect and many problems have been identified. Among them, ethical questions about the responsible conduct of reviewers who can wield considerable power behind a cloak of anonymity. more

The Ethics of Peer Review: Principles (3/5)

Red(May 13th, 2016) Peer review is at the heart of research communication. However, the process is far from perfect and many problems have been identified. Among them, ethical questions about the responsible conduct of reviewers who can wield considerable power behind a cloak of anonymity. more

The Ethics of Peer Review: Problems (2/5)

Red(May 11th, 2016) Peer review is at the heart of research communication. However, the process is far from perfect and many problems have been identified. Among them, ethical questions about the responsible conduct of reviewers who can wield considerable power behind a cloak of anonymity. more

The Ethics of Peer Review: History (1/5)

Red(May 10th, 2016) Peer review is at the heart of research communication. However, the process is far from perfect and many problems have been identified. Among them, ethical questions about the responsible conduct of reviewers who can wield considerable power behind a cloak of anonymity. more

Cute but Dangerous

Red(May 2nd, 2016) Moth larvae might not have swords or shotguns to defend themselves against predators but they invented another, as effective strategy. (Warning: This article contains graphic scenes of gruesome behaviour!) more


Orca Linguistics

Red(April 28th, 2016) Killer whales use sound to navigate and communicate. They converse in vocal dialects, a unique repertoire of calls shared by each pod of whales. By using an agent-based computer model of call evolution, Scottish scientists analysed which factors influence the whales' language. more

Videogames against Malaria

Red(April 26th, 2016) Spanish researchers at the Technical University of Madrid develop a Malaria "Candy Crush" game to research new diagnostic tools. more

Bioprinting Thick Vascularised Tissues

Red(April 22nd, 2016) We've all seen the impact 3D printing has had. But have you wondered what it would be like if we could 3D print living tissues? Wonder no longer – it turns out we already can. more

The Divine Rise of Ultra-Sociality

Red(April 20th, 2016) Is sociality written in our genes? A game of dice suggests that all it needs for humans to cooperate is an all-seeing, moral and punitive god. more

Inflammation Overload

Red(April 18th, 2016) For decades nobody knew what caused painful skin lesions in a Belgian family. Now, researchers at Leuven University have finally caught the culprit. more

Aldehydes Eliminate Virus Vectors

Red(April 15 th, 2016) The race is on to get the Zika virus under control. In an unprecedented move, academia and industry agreed to share their data. Irish company, Microbide, makes available its results describing the lethal effect of its biocides on the larvae of Aedes and Anopheles mosquitos. more

Evaluation of Research Has Increased Over Time But it is Necessary

Red(April 13th, 2016) As member of an independent expert group, Stefan Kuhlmann was involved in investigating the outcome and impact of the 7th EU Framework Programme. Lab Times talked to him about his career, his experiences as an FP7 evaluator and also about current trends in research evaluation. more

Company Companion

Red(April 11th, 2016) In the quest for understanding the role of epigenetics in cancer, UK researchers and a bioinformatics company join forces to find value in complex biological data. more

Swedes Still Trust Scientists... Despite Macchiarini

Red(April 8th, 2016) Two surveys undertaken in late 2015 and early 2016 confirm the Swedish public continue to trust their researchers, despite all the negative press covering Paolo Macchiarini's case of scientific misconduct and fraud at the Karolinska Institute. more

Ancient Deposition

Red(April 5th, 2016) Microbiologists based at Queen’s University Belfast present stratigraphic, geochemical and microbiological evidence that potentially identifies the alpine route Hannibal of Carthage followed from the Rhone basin into Italia. more

Communicating Science beyond the Lab

Red(April 1st, 2016) With most research publicly-funded, communicating scientific results to lay audiences has become increasingly important. The Comm4Science conference looks at past, present and future of science communication and provides vital tips. more


Breaking the Writer’s Block

Red(March 30th, 2016) Some say, writing a manuscript is the hardest part of research. To make it easier for you, open access publisher Biomed Central has a few hopefully helpful tips. more

A Hare-y Relationship

Red(March 23rd, 2016) Easter Island is home to some unusual organisms, like Tangata manu, a unique bird species, that lays eggs with extraordinary patterns, tinted in all colours of the rainbow. Now, researchers have unravelled the bird’s genome. more

How to Train a Subtle Nose

Red(March 21st, 2016) Because of their remarkable olfactory prowess, dogs have been used for a variety of forensic tasks. French neuroscientists evaluated the routine training of dogs used to match samples of individual human scents. more

Through the Iron Curtain

Red(March 18th, 2016) Medical historians dug deep into hospital archives to examine the scope of drug testing in East Germany. Was everything ethically above board? more

Taming Demons with MAGeK

Red(March 16th, 2016) Harvard University's Xiaole Shirley Liu has released a freely-available quality-control, analysis and visualisation platform for high-throughput CRISPR screens: "MAGeK-VISPR". more

Is there “Institutionalised Corruption” in Science? (Part 3 of 3)

Red(March 14th, 2016) In part 3 of our series on corrupt publication practices, Jeremy Garwood wonders whether large publication numbers are suspicious. more

Is there “Institutionalised Corruption” in Science? (Part 2 of 3)

Red(March 11th, 2016) In part 2 of our series on corrupt publication practices, Jeremy Garwood looks at whether there are new statistical clues to authorship abuse. more

Is there “Institutionalised Corruption” in Science? (Part 1 of 3)

Red(March 9th, 2016) Lab Times has received a call for more publication statistics from Peter Lawrence, a well-known critic of bibliometrics. He says that further analysis of publication databases may help to reveal authorship abuse and corrupt publication practices. more

Precious Poop

Red(March 7th, 2016) Faecal implants may still make most of us go yuck but for patients suffering from chronic and repetitive gut infections, it is often the last hope. Now, Europe’s first donor faeces bank has opened in the Netherlands. more

All in One Place

Red(March 4th, 2016) A new umbrella repository called One Repo wants to integrate all 4,000 existing repositories for Open Access articles. The work is well ahead and soon, access to your paper of interest is only one click away. more

Should you Study Abroad? Yes!

Red(March 2nd, 2016) Surveying past, present and future Erasmus programme participants, a study found there are big differences between students from the North, the East and the South. But generally, the study experience abroad is a good one. more


Good Vibes

Red(February 29th, 2016) Long distant communication is easy for humans; we just pick up a phone. Animals can’t do that; some rely on vibrational communication. What is the new research field, biotremology, about and how can it help deter pests? more

Why Human Embryos?

Red(February 26th, 2016) The world collectively held its breath, when a UK research group received permission to genetically manipulate human embryos. What’s the rationale behind the group’s experiments? more

All you Need is Love… and Gametes

Red(February 24th, 2016) A run of bad luck brought the elkhorn coral in the Caribbean Sea close to extinction. But scientists have come up with unusual ways to save the marine invertebrates. more

The Right Way Home

Red(February 22nd, 2016) Although not at home on our shores, the European FP7-funded PENGUINAV project was initiated in 2011 to discover how groups of penguins coordinate their travels. Now, more and more results shed light on the matter. more

Thanks for Checking

Red(February 19th, 2016) Re-analysed data in a paper about an ancient Ethiopian genome reveals that scientists make human errors, too. more

Joining Forces against Cancer

Red(February 17th, 2016) The upcoming London Cancer Hub will be an international centre for pioneering cancer research, treatment, education and enterprise. It is expected to boost cancer drug discovery by delivering two extra cancer drugs every five years. more

Grantee Investigated

Red(February 15th, 2016) Last December, EMBO announced the winners of its 2015 Installation Grants. Only one month later, an influential paper from one of the grantees got retracted and EMBO launched an investigation. more

Red Gold: the Real Deal?

Red(February 12th, 2016) A new metabolomic test allows researchers to distinguish between traditional Spanish saffron and its imposters. more

It’s not Easy Being Clean

Red(February 10th, 2016) Waste doesn’t need to be burnt or burrowed – it can be turned into something useful. Portuguese scientists have discovered a way to make green detergents from agricultural and forest residues. more

Where are the Pockets?

Red(February 8th, 2016) Allosteric sites on proteins have enormous potential for the development of new and better drugs. Finding such sites is, however, very difficult. But that is changing thanks to AlloPred, an online utility from the laboratory of Michael Sternberg at Imperial College, London. more

Going Viral

Red(February 5th, 2016) Just a short while ago, the fight against the Ebola virus was won. Now, a new virus is frightening the world, in particular people in the Americas. We contacted two experts to learn more about this international emergency known as the Zika virus. more

Unlimited Openness

Red(February 3rd, 2016) Research Ideas and Outcomes (RIO) is the latest journal launched by Pensoft, an open access publisher with a history of innovation. Via its digital platform, preliminary stages of the academic workflow and final research reports can be authored, reviewed and published. more

Smarter than we Think?

Red(February 1st, 2016) Just a silly idea or a new chapter in plant biology? With recently acquired funding, two biologists want to condition plants, just like Ivan Pavlov did with his dogs. Will they succeed? more


Plastic Pollution in the Lab

Red(January 29th, 2016) A whopping five-and-a-half million tons of plastic waste is generated annually in bioscience labs over the world. The global scientific community needs to sit up and take notice, urge Mauricio Urbina and colleagues. more

The Power of the Crowd gets Stronger

Red(January 27th, 2016) In research or elsewhere, every helping hand is welcome. Swedish scientists found, there’s an emerging trend of publications, featuring non-scientific personnel: citizen scientists. more

Making the Most of What We Have

Red(January 25th, 2016) It is typically more economical to repurpose old possessions than to go out and buy new ones. As it turns out, this same principle may also apply to cancer treatments. more

3D Genomics to the Rescue?

Red(January 22nd, 2016) Mutations in one gene or many are behind numerous debilitating diseases. To be able to cure these diseases, we have to understand them. 3D genomics might do the trick, if it can overcome its teething troubles. more

Shall we Dance?

Red(January 20th, 2016) Elephants do it, chimpanzees do it, and yes, even humans like to shake a leg from time-to-time. What started the evolution of dance? Swaying to a salsa rhythm, our writer, Alejandrolvido, tries to find the answer. more

An Entire Galaxy to be Explored

Red(January 18th, 2016) Who would have thought there’s a beautiful galaxy inside our cells – you only have to make it visible. A new method for unveiling thousands of contact points between genes in 3D takes you on a journey into space, revealing new insights into mouse development along the way. more

The Agar Tweet Twitch

Red(January 15th, 2016) Recently, Nature News issued a warning: there’s not enough seaweed for everyone. Microbiologists should, thus, stock up on their agar, as the dwindling algae harvest is about to imperil the culturing of lab microbes. How worried should researchers be? more

The "Voinnet Case": Lost Control

Red(January 13th, 2016) What was behind the multiple paper manipulations by Olivier Voinnet et al.? An attempted explanation... more

The Science of Science Advice - Policy-Making Explained to Scientists (9)

Red(January 11th, 2016) Many government decisions have a scientific element. But who decides what kind of scientific advice will be used? How it is presented to the politicians and citizens they represent? Jeremy Garwood looks at the rise of the ‘Science of Science Advice’. more

The Science of Science Advice - A World of Variability and Potential Error (8)

Red(January 7th, 2016) Many government decisions have a scientific element. But who decides what kind of scientific advice will be used? How it is presented to the politicians and citizens they represent? Jeremy Garwood looks at the rise of the ‘Science of Science Advice’. more

The Science of Science Advice - Interpretive Scientific Skills - for Politicians (7)

Red(January 4th, 2016) Many government decisions have a scientific element. But who decides what kind of scientific advice will be used? How it is presented to the politicians and citizens they represent? Jeremy Garwood looks at the rise of the ‘Science of Science Advice’. more


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